In the Company of My Sisters

In the Company of My Sisters

Black Women and Self-esteem

Book - 1993
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Penguin Putnam
NATIONAL BESTSELLER
WINNER OF THE BLACKBOARD NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR


“Practical, hilarious, and common sense advice for self-care and self-recovery.”—Common Boundary

Wise, intimate, and full of practical insights, In the Company of My Sisters is the first book by a Black psychotherapist to address the issue of self-esteem in Black women's lives. Julia A. Boyd has drawn from a wealth of experience—her own and that of her "sister circle"—to take a hard and honest look at the realities and issues Black women face. "I wrote this book to validate and celebrate who we are," Boyd has said. "We have been the recipients of many distorted messages about our ethnicity and our femaleness."

Baker & Taylor
Drawing on her work as a therapist and educator, as well as the lives of her sisters, the author explores the familial, personal, and social struggles faced by black women, and offers ideas for finding strength and self-esteem. 30,000 first printing. Tour.

Baker
& Taylor

Drawing on her work as a therapist and educator, as well as the lives of her sisters, the author explores the familial, personal, and social struggles faced by Black women, and offers ideas for finding strength and self-esteem

Publisher: New York : Dutton, c1993.
ISBN: 9780525937081
0525937080
Branch Call Number: 301.412 BOY
Characteristics: xii, 147, [1] p. ; 21 cm.

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oldhag Jul 13, 2012

Having grown up in the same town as the author, on the other side of, I felt a frisson of homegirl recognition when I began her book. When Boyd writes that: "Self-esteem wasn't the issue for my parents or their parents. Survival was their primary goal." she speaks to the cruelty and horror of racism in America. The way this society has been intentionally constructed to keep "those niggers running" never let them have stability, security, or serenity, e.g., being randomly stopped by the police for no reason at all. I believe that it is the unrelenting struggle to merely survive that grinds down black people, particularly black women, to the point where "harsh parenting" becomes the default option simply because there is neither the time nor the energy to invest in sensitive, self-esteem talks with our children. Boyd writes: "As a child, I was never directly told that I was loved, but then again it never occurred to me to ask the question. In our house, love was an assumed notion as opposed to a spoken reality." In her chapter on adult love, Boyd quotes "Angie" who says, " 'I don't wait to be chosen, I pick who I want to be with. But the problem is I always pick the wrong type of person'." I wish Boyd had suggested that Angie identify the trait in her own character of which she is most proud: courage? generosity? loyalty? and look for that characteristic in a potential mate. It seems to me that a match based on a shared value stands a better chance of lasting than a mate chosen for physical attractiveness, earnings potential, etc.

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