The Rise of American Democracy

The Rise of American Democracy

Jefferson to Lincoln

Book - 2005
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Baker & Taylor
A political history of how the fledgling American republic developed into a democratic state at the onset of the Civil War offers insight into how historical beliefs about democracy compromised democratic progress, providing coverage of the rivalry between Jeffersonians and Federalists, and identifying the roles of key contributors, including Andrew Jackson, Anti-Masons, and fugitive slaves. 50,000 first printing.

Norton Pub
A grand political history in a fresh new style of how the elitist young American republic became a rough-and-tumble democracy.
In this magisterial work, Sean Wilentz traces a historical arc from the earliest days of the republic to the opening shots of the Civil War. One of our finest writers of history, Wilentz brings to life the era after the American Revolution, when the idea of democracy remained contentious, and Jeffersonians and Federalists clashed over the role of ordinary citizens in government of, by, and for the people. The triumph of Andrew Jackson soon defined this role on the national level, while city democrats, Anti-Masons, fugitive slaves, and a host of others hewed their own local definitions. In these definitions Wilentz recovers the beginnings of a discontenttwo starkly opposed democracies, one in the North and another in the Southand the wary balance that lasted until the election of Abraham Lincoln sparked its bloody resolution. 75 illustrations.

Book News
Although it had democratic elements, the American republic founded in the 18th century was not a democracy. It only became one, argues Wilentz (history, Princeton U.), through constant political conflict and struggle over the meaning of democracy itself. In chronicling American politics from the Revolution to the Civil War, he offers an account of how democracy developed piecemeal at the state, local, and national levels. Among his major themes are how social changes such as the commercialization of the free labor North or the renaissance of plantation slavery in the South affected the ebb and flow of democracy, perceptions of these social changes as struggles over contending ideas of democracy, and the central importance of the fate of slavery to the course of American democracy. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

A political history of how the fledgling American republic developed into a democratic state offers insight into how historical beliefs about democracy compromised democratic progress and identifies the roles of key contributors.

Publisher: New York : Norton, c2005.
Edition: 1st ed.
ISBN: 9780393058208
0393058204
Characteristics: xxiii, 1044 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps, ports. (some col.) ; 25 cm.

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Cabby
Dec 06, 2007

Finalist of the 2006 Pulitzer prize for history.

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