Wickett's Remedy

Wickett's Remedy

A Novel

Book - 2005
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Random House, Inc.
In a multidimensional, intricately wrought narrative, Myla Goldberg leads us back to Boston in the early part of the twentieth century and into two completely captivating worlds. One is that of Lydia, an Irish American shopgirl with bigger aspirations than your average young woman from South Boston. She seems to be well on her way to the life she has dreamed of when she marries Henry Wickett, a shy medical student and the scion of a Boston Brahmin family. However, soon after their wedding, Henry abruptly quits medical school to create a mail-order patent medicine called Wickett’s Remedy, and just as Lydia begins to adjust to her husband’s new vocation, the infamous Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918 begins its deadly sweep across the world, irrevocably changing their lives.

In a world turned almost unrecognizable by swift and sudden tragedy, Lydia finds herself working as a nurse in an experimental ward dedicated to understanding the raging epidemic—through the use of human subjects.

Meanwhile, a parallel narrative explores the world of QD Soda, the illegitimate offspring of Wickett’s Remedy, stolen away by Henry Wickett’s one-time business partner Quentin Driscoll, who goes about transforming it into a soft drink empire.

Throughout the novel we hear from a chorus of other voices who offer a running commentary from the book’s margins, playing off the ongoing narrative and cleverly illuminating the slippery interplay of perception and memory. Based on years of research and evoking actual events, Wickett’s Remedy perfectly captures the texture of the times and brings a colorful cast of characters vividly to life—none more so than Lydia, a heroine as winning and appealing as Eliza, the beloved spelling champion of Bee Season.

With dazzling dexterity, Goldberg has fashioned a novel that beautifully combines the intimate and the epic. Wickett’s Remedy announces her arrival as a major novelist.

Baker & Taylor
Dreaming of a better life for herself, Lydia, an Irish-American shopgirl from South Boston, gets her chance when she marries medical student Henry Wickett, the scion of a Boston Brahmin family, but her life is turned upside down when Henry quits medical school to promote a patent medicine and the world is swept by the devastating Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918. 75,000 first printing.

Blackwell North Amer
Myla Goldberg leads us back to Boston in the early part of the twentieth century and into two completely captivating worlds. One is that of Lydia, an Irish American shopgirl with bigger aspirations than your average young woman from South Boston. She seems to be well on her way to the life she has dreamed of when she marries Henry Wickett, a shy medical student and the scion of a Boston Brahmin family. However, soon after their wedding, Henry abruptly quits medical school to create a mail-order patent medicine called Wickett's Remedy, and just as Lydia begins to adjust to her husband's new vocation, the infamous Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918 begins its deadly sweep across the world, irrevocably changing their lives.
In a world turned almost unrecognizable by swift and sudden tragedy, Lydia finds herself working as a nurse in an experimental ward dedicated to understanding the raging epidemic - through the use of human subjects.
Meanwhile, a parallel narrative explores the world of QD Soda, the illegitimate offspring of Wickett's Remedy, stolen away by Henry Wickett's one-time business partner, Quentin Driscoll, who goes about transforming it into a soft drink empire.
Throughout the novel we hear from a chorus of other voices who offer a running commentary from the book's margins, playing off the ongoing narrative and cleverly illuminating the slippery interplay of perception and memory. Based on years of research and evoking actual events, Wickett's Remedy perfectly captures the texture of the times and brings a colorful cast of characters vividly to life - none more so than Lydia, a heroine as winning and appealing as Eliza, the beloved spelling champion of Bee Season.

Baker
& Taylor

Dreaming of a better life, Lydia, an Irish-American shopgirl from South Boston, gets her chance when she marries medical student Henry Wickett, the scion of a Boston family, but her life is turned upside down when Henry quits medical school.

Publisher: New York : Doubleday, c2005.
Edition: 1st ed.
ISBN: 9780385513241
0385513240
Characteristics: 326 p. ; 25 cm.

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ChristchurchLib May 25, 2015

"With the Great War on the horizon, South Boston shopgirl Lydia Kilkenny marries Henry Wickett, a medical student from a wealthy family. The child of Irish immigrants, Lydia is looking to better her lot in life. But when Henry quits medical school in order to peddle patent medicine, Lydia's dreams are deferred -- and then derailed entirely after the Spanish Flu claims Henry's life. But Lydia has never been one to lie down and die, not even during a worldwide pandemic. Fans of E.L. Doctorow will enjoy this meticulously researched slice of American history. And for readers especially interested in the 1918 flu epidemic, Reina James' This Time of Dying is a more sombre depiction of the event, set in London."
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Tjad2L
Jun 22, 2017

Tjad2L thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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