Border Correspondent

Border Correspondent

Selected Writings, 1955-1970

Book - 1995
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Book News
A collection of dispatches by the first Mexican-American to become a correspondent in a major English-language newspaper. Samples his early work for the El Paso Herald-Post and later for the Los Angeles Times . Salazar (1928-70) was killed by police while covering an anti-war demonstration in East Los Angeles. Includes an index but no bibliography; annotations clarify contemporary references. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

University of California Press
This first major collection of former Los Angeles Times reporter and columnist Ruben Salazar's writings, is a testament to his pioneering role in the Mexican American community, in journalism, and in the evolution of race relations in the U.S. Taken together, the articles serve as a documentary history of the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and of the changing perspective of the nation as a whole.

Since his tragic death while covering the massive Chicano antiwar moratorium in Los Angeles on August 29, 1970, Ruben Salazar has become a legend in the Chicano community. As a reporter and later as a columnist for the Los Angeles Times, Salazar was the first journalist of Mexican American background to cross over into the mainstream English-language press. He wrote extensively on the Mexican American community and served as a foreign correspondent in Latin America and Vietnam. This first major collection of Salazar's writing is a testament to his pioneering role in the Mexican American community, in journalism, and in the evolution of race relations in the United States. Taken together, the articles serve as a documentary history of the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and of the changing perspective of the nation as a whole.

Border Correspondent presents selections from each period of Salazar's career. The stories and columns document a growing frustration with the Kennedy administration, a young César Chávez beginning to organize farm workers, the Vietnam War, and conflict between police and community in East Los Angeles. One of the first to take investigative journalism into the streets and jails, Salazar's first-hand accounts of his experiences with drug users and police, ordinary people and criminals, make compelling reading.

Mario García's introduction provides a biographical sketch of Salazar and situates him in the context of American journalism and Chicano history.


Blackwell North Amer
Border Correspondent is the first major collection of the journalism of Ruben Salazar. Although there has long been a vigorous Spanish-language press in the United States, Salazar was the first journalist of Mexican American background to cross over into mainstream English-language print media with his reporting for the Los Angeles Times during the 1960s. Salazar was also the first significant foreign correspondent of Mexican descent, and in 1969 he became the first Mexican American columnist for a major newspaper.
Mario Garcia's introduction to this collection provides a biographical sketch of Salazar as well as a thoughtful evaluation of his significance to American journalism and to the history of the Mexican American community in California.

Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 1995.
ISBN: 9780520201255
0520201256
Branch Call Number: 972.1 SAL
Characteristics: xx, 283 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Additional Contributors: GarcĂ­a, Mario T.

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