Black Coffee

Black Coffee

A Hercule Poirot Novel

Book - 1998
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Baker & Taylor
Master sleuth Hercule Poirot and Captain Hastings head to Surrey at the request of England's premier physicist, only to find the client dead, a top-secret formula missing, and a house filled with suspects

Blackwell North Amer
In the first novel to appear in over twenty years, perhaps Christie's most famous and beloved detective, Hercule Poirot, returns to bring his "little grey cells" to bear on one more case. In the spring of 1934, Poirot is summoned to Surrey by England's most prominent physicist, Sir Claud Amory. Amory fears that someone in his household is attempting to steal his latest discovery, a formula critical to England's defense. Poirot, with Captain Hastings at his side, rushes to Surrey but arrives too late. Amory has died, his formula is missing, and anyone in this country house, full of relatives and guests, could have been responsible.
Originally written by Agatha Christie in 1930 as a three-act play, now adapted as a novel by Charles Osborne, Black Coffee is classic Christie at its finest.

Baker
& Taylor

Master sleuth Hercule Poirot and Captain Hastings head to Surrey at the request of England's premier physicist, Sir Claud Amory, only to find the client dead, a top-secret formula missing, and a house filled with suspects, in a novel adapted from Christie's original play. 75,000 first printing. Mystery Guild.

Publisher: New York : St. Martin's Press, 1998.
ISBN: 9780312192419
031219241X
Branch Call Number: M OSB
Characteristics: 221 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Additional Contributors: Christie, Agatha 1890-1976.

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DuchessA2017
Jun 15, 2017

This may be a Hercule Poirot story and have been adapted by a screenplay written by Agatha Christie, unfortunately the writer simply doesn't capture Ms. Christie's ability. I couldn't get past Chapter 4.

EuSei Dec 18, 2014

This is a book adaptation of Agatha Christie’s homonymous play. Actually, reading the book one can easily imagine a sate. Unfortunately Mr. Osborne is never able to emulate Mrs. Christie’s style. He sometimes gets really close, but falls back into descriptions she would have easily inserted in or in-between character speeches. There are many awkward moments, such as this: “Richard moved to the phone, lifted the receiver and asked for the number.” Mrs. Christie, I believe, never describes unimportant actions in minutia. One thing surprised me though: her use of a ruse devised by the killer in her first Poirot book… A good read, nevertheless. I will probably read the play.

bookfanatic1979 Apr 16, 2014

This story was first written as a screenplay, later adapted into novel form by Charles Osborne, and it’s still easy to see the original format. There’s much more attention given to where the characters are standing, gestures and facial expressions, exits and entrances, and their actions while they’re “on stage” than is usual in a novel. I think it’s a successful transfer from screen to book, however. The story is pure Christie as Poirot once again proves his mettle.

EuSei Nov 13, 2013

This is a book adaptation of Agatha Christie’s homonymous play. Actually, reading the book one can easily imagine a sate. Unfortunately Mr. Osborne is never able to emulate Mrs. Christie’s style. He sometimes gets really close, but falls back into descriptions she would have easily inserted in or in-between character speeches. There are many awkward moments, such as this: “Richard moved to the phone, lifted the receiver and asked for the number.” Mrs. Christie, I believe, never describes unimportant actions in minutia. One thing surprised me though: her use of a ruse devised by the killer in her first Poirot book… A good read, nevertheless. I will probably read the play.

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